About

Christine Hurford is a Londoner, now living in Cumbria, whose work responds to place and time, linking ancient places, customs, lives and beliefs with contemporary times.

Looking especially at lives ignored or disregarded by others and bringing them to greater prominence, she works mainly with clay, fired and raw, but also with other materials such as plaster, metal and wood.

Recent work has included large pieces installed outdoors - briefly for a couple of hours as at Voreda or above Ullswater or for a few weeks such as Form Reform along the River Eden. Insects have often been a vehicle for expressing deeper feelings such as Death & Life with hundreds of dead flies in Carlisle Cathedral, Remembering 409 with red insects at an old cotton mill and a mass of white cockroaches at Ashness Bridge, Borrowdale.

Drawings, sketches and photographs are important and some are shown on this website.

Since graduating in 2007 with a first class honours degree, she has exhibited in diverse places - from muddy ditches to empty shops and old buildings as well as galleries (occasionally!)


2019

The dates so far for exhibitions are:

Saturday June 15 - Sunday June 23 Sarah Losh Heritage Centre, Wreay, Carlisle CA4 0RL open daily 10 - 4, on our disappearing insects.

July 5 - mid August, Greystoke Church, open daylight hours showing with Janis Young,Thora Talling and Daphne and Jeremy Honey.

Saturday August 17 - Tuesday August 27 Carlisle Cathedral south aisle. Installation on ants and locusts


Wednesday August 28 - Sunday September 1 Friargate, Penrith, 10 - 4 photographs and paintings of an ancient forest in Cumbria. Showing with Jane Peet and Sara Musgrave

Saturday September 7 - Sunday September 15, EVAN trail - drawing the River Eden from near the bridges at: Sat 7th Wetheral, Mon 9th Armathwaite, Tues 10th Lazonby, Wed 11th Langwathby, Thurs 12th Appleby, Fri 13th Warcop, Sat 14th Kirkby Stephen

Wednesday September 18 - Wednesday September 25, National Trust Bark House bothy by Ashness Bridge, Borrowdale 10 - 4 on wad, insects and Langstrath